CNC Career Training: Work in an Exploding Field

Do you love working with computers and using technology to create? Do you enjoy using your imagination to solve seemingly unsolvable problems? Do you hate working just to make ends meet? If so, a CNC Machinist career is perfect for you.

United Scientific Inc. can help you get the CNC Machine training you need to become a highly-skilled CNC Machinist.  

WHAT IS CNC?
Industries worldwide have used Computer Numerical Control since the 1940s, though many people have never heard of CNC.

Before the arrival of advanced CNC machining, various manufacturing aspects such as mills, drills, and routers needed operators. The operators read specifications and drawings to determine the best and quickest approach to create and produce the necessary parts.

Technological advancements, such as 3D printing, led to many improvements to industries worldwide. Today, instead of manually administering every step in the manufacturing process, CNC Machinists can simply program CNC machines to interpret CAD files.

As a CNC Machinist, you’ll play an indispensable part in manufacturing processes. 

WHAT DOES A CNC MACHINIST DO?

Group of young students  in technical vocational training with young female muslim teacher

As a CNC Machinist/Programmer, you’ll use computers and the latest manufacturing technology to produce parts and products for a multitude of diverse industries and companies. 

CNC Machinists often use blueprints and 3-dimensional computer technology to develop the software used to create the parts and products used in everything from the aerospace industry to food services.

Computer integration and advanced automation have created a demand for more complicated parts and products to be produced faster than ever. 

If you work at or have worked at, an engineering or manufacturing company, you’ll no doubt work with CNC at some point. With the right credentials, you’ll earn promotions and gain more financial security and stability.

CNC EMPLOYMENT OUTLOOK 

The CNC Machinist career field continues to grow every year. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, “employment of tool and die makers is projected to decline seven percent from 2016 to 2026.” 

However, during the same time frame, new technological advancements and innovations, including CNC machining and programming, have created a need for employees with CNC machinist and programming skills. 

Employers continue to state the difficulties in finding employees with CNC machinists and programming skills. Entry-level positions offer immediate employment and an opportunity to attain valuable work experience as a CNC machinist.

The outlook for CNC Machinists sounds good, but success in the field first requires the necessary training.

CNC MACHINIST TRAINING

Education is often a crucial factor in finding excellent jobs. Although a degree or certificate in CNC machining isn’t quite a “must-have,” it does add a significant benefit in helping you get your foot in the door.  

The modern CNC Machinist needs to have the following skills at a minimal:

  • Basic understanding of electronics
  • Computer literacy
  • Knowledge of basic physics
  • Time Management
  • Problem-Solving Skills
  • Team Player

Employers are seeking individuals with formal training. Formal training may include apprenticeships, certification, or post-secondary training. Many employers, mostly for liability reasons, seldom hire machinists who don’t possess some type of formal training.

In the United States, many vocational training facilities and trade schools have incorporated courses accredited by the National Institute of Metalworking Skills. NIMS accreditation “is the nation’s only distinction for excellence in metalworking training as based on NIMS industry-written, industry-approved skills standards.”

The majority of courses are designed to educate and provide hands-on instructions for various types of CNC topics. Some subjects include: 

  • Introduction to CNC Machines 
  • Basics of the CNC Mill 
  • Computer Numerical Control Fundamentals
  • Geometric Dimensions and Tolerancing 
  • CNC Manufacturing Shop Management
  • Lean Manufacturing 

Mastery of CNC Machinist and programing training offers multiple options for employment in different areas, including:

  • CNC programming
  • CAD-CAM system programing
  • CNC service technician
  • CNC applications engineers
  • CNC school instructor 
  • CNC Lathe Operator
  • Shop Supervisor
  • Management

If attending classes in a formal setting is not possible due to time constraints or budget, don’t fret. There are many online CNC training courses available, and some offer free video training.

Individuals should ensure they receive the skills and training needed to perform CNC machining whatever training method they choose. Training may include inspection and safety regulations, metal cutting, work holding, programming, and math.

CNC Machinists aren’t only in the manufacturing industries. As automation is a regular part of everyday life, it is not hard to imagine that CNC Machining technology is by industries affecting everyday life. These industries include:

  • Banking & ATMs. 
  • Transportation & Aerospace
  • Cell phone towers
  • Gas Stations
  • Agriculture
  • Smart Home automation
  • Medical 
  • Broadcasting/Television

As you train for your CNC Machinist certification, you’ll gain a wide array of skills, knowledge, and training to help keep the world running at peak efficiency. 

THE FUTURE OF CNC

From robotics to 3D printing, the global demand for CNC-machined products continues to grow as innovation and technology improve the way parts and products are manufactured. 

There is even a growing demand for At-Home CNC, offering small business to enhance its product development at faster and cheaper rates.

Being a CNC machinist can be a rewarding career for those with the right skillset. In today’s technology-dependent world, further automation of offices and factories, advances in the medical industry, and advanced scientific research will only continue to spark the demand for skilled CNC Machinist and programmers.

UNITED SCIENTIFIC INC

Here at United Scientific Inc., we “Manufacture Results,” firm in the belief that remaining “Scientific in Process, United in Purpose,” enhances our success rates. Located in St. Paul, Minnesota, we’ve built a solid reputation for being the best CNC and precision machining entity around. 

With dedication to machining the best precision products, we strive to prepare for future innovations and industry demands. At United Scientific,  having the right CNC machinists is essential to our success. Therefore, we are committed to hiring the best machinists, and programmers only help us stay at the forefront of the machining industry.  

Our machinists understand CNC tasks requires attention-to-detail and discipline. They know it requires focus and the ability to overcome obstacles to ensure we meet our clients’ specifications.

The world will continue to change as technology continues to improve and enhance our everyday lives. At United Scientific Inc, we will continue to evolve, and stay current with innovation, and prepare for the future. 

CALL US!
To learn more about our services, contact us at 651-483-1500, or email sales@usimn.com.